We're experiencing intermittent issues with customers making payments and updating account balances after payment. We're sorry for any inconvenience & ask that you return later to complete your transaction.

We're experiencing intermittent issues with customers making payments and updating account balances after payment. We're sorry for any inconvenience & ask that you return later to complete your transaction.

We're experiencing intermittent issues with customers making payments and updating account balances after payment. We're sorry for any inconvenience & ask that you return later to complete your transaction.

We're experiencing intermittent issues with customers making payments and updating account balances after payment. We're sorry for any inconvenience & ask that you return later to complete your transaction.

We're experiencing intermittent issues with customers making payments and updating account balances after payment. We're sorry for any inconvenience & ask that you return later to complete your transaction.

We're experiencing intermittent issues with customers making payments and updating account balances after payment. We're sorry for any inconvenience & ask that you return later to complete your transaction.

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As of: 7:44 AM, 4/25/24

Your Help is Needed

The power is in your hands. How can you help?

The electric grid is bigger than us - and Michigan. We are part of an interconnected grid where energy supplies are shared with over 190 energy providers across 15 U.S. states and Manitoba, Canada. This grid is one of the world’s largest energy supply markets. The not-for-profit Midcontinent Independent System Operator (MISO) is responsible for keeping the power flowing across the region reliably and cost effectively. Sharing energy resources helps manage increased customer demands during regional weather impacts like summer heat waves or winter deep freezes. It also helps during times of unplanned repairs or supply chain issues. It also means the energy we generate does not go directly to our own customers, but to the larger market managed by MISO.

MISO uses weather forecasts and advanced technology to predict needs, monitor real-time use across the system and coordinates supply throughout the region between energy generators and providers like us. Even though there is a significant cushion of electric supply most days of the year, those high demand days can get a little close for MISO’s comfort.

While we can generate enough electricity for our customers and then some, in the last few years not every network member has been able to contribute their share. This puts the responsibility on others in MISO to close the gap – including us. As the energy industry changes, we’re committed to not only doing our part but also helping the larger grid by reducing electric demand when needed.

How the Grid is Managed

Like mutual assistance in catastrophic weather, we are ready to respond if necessary. If MISO needs to reduce demand to balance supply and stabilize the grid, its members follow a series of steps to help. We all start by using less energy at our own locations and begin operating all available generation sites. Usually, MISO will pause sales to non- members and purchase electricity from other operators if needed.

We then ask business and residential customers in energy savings programs to reduce their use during peak times. If further reduction in electric use is required, we communicate through our website, app, email, social media pages and in the media to ask all customers in the at-risk regions, regardless of their energy provider or cause of supply gap, to voluntarily reducing their electric use.

While it has never happened in MISO’s history, if the voluntary efforts were not enough, MISO may ask certain energy providers to rotate 2-hour interruptions of service. This stage would not impact all customers in the MISO region at the same time and can affect homes and businesses served by companies who are providing enough energy to the grid.

In the unlikely event this happens, we ensure critical community services - such as hospitals, emergency response facilities and television/radio stations – do not lose power or are restored quickly if they do. Nevertheless, it’s still important that these organizations reduce their own energy use as much as possible.

Meeting Our Commitments

We’re confident we have more than enough reliable energy generation sources to meet our customers’ needs, while also contributing the necessary supply to the larger MISO network. Each year, we provide proof of our ability to serve our customers to the Michigan Public Service Commission.

We schedule maintenance work when the temperatures are milder and more predictable, and we plan ahead if extreme weather is expected. We’re investing in new generation sources, improving reliability, utility-scale battery storage, smart grid technology and energy reduction programs for customers. When it’s needed most, the Ludington Pumped Storage hydroelectric plant acts as a giant ‘battery’ that can kick on at a moment’s notice to release water to power turbines along Lake Michigan.

Our Clean Energy Plan, which lays out how we will serve Michigan now and well into the future, is updated every 3-5 years to consider a variety of possible scenarios in a fast-evolving energy industry. Our long-term planning prepares for increased electric needs, including the transition to electric vehicles and attracting new businesses to Michigan, by balancing our generation sources with planned energy reduction efforts a few days a year. While adapting to changing conditions and embracing growing technologies in our planning, we also are focused on lowering customer bills and doing what’s best for the planet for generations to come.

A Force of Change, Together

adjust thermostat during extreme heat eventsAfter our planning and maintenance, the power is in your hands. On the few days of the year when electric demand could be more than what is available, simply dialing the thermostat a few degrees and holding off on using big appliances can quickly change the course. A few adjustments by one may feel small, but when millions act it saves the day for everyone.

Not only does reducing energy during high use days maintain reliability, it also saves you money. Energy is no different than other markets, so when there is less of something available the price increases. By shifting electric use to when its cheaper to buy - which is most of the day – you also pay less for that energy. Finally, when you sign up for one of our energy savings programs, we help simplify the process and you earn annual financial incentives.

Small Changes with Big Impacts:

  • Turn off lights and unplug unused electronics (energy vampires!).

  • Change your thermostat: In hot weather, raise it to 78 degrees, use fans and close blinds or curtains to block heat from the sun. In cold weather, lower it to 65 degrees and trap the heat by closing doors on unused rooms.

  • Wash or dry clothes, run your dishwasher, turn on your pool pump or use other large appliances before 2 p.m. and after 7 p.m.

  • Use smart technology to help lower your energy use and bill. Join as many of our easy and free customer energy reduction programs as you can. You never lose control and can always opt-out or discontinue participation later.

  • Find ways to lower your energy consumption. Small changes have a big impact!

While interconnected electric grids like ours help ensure more reliable, affordable electricity year-round, it is a team effort we are proud to be part of.